learn science, technology, engineering, arts and math, Raytown students will launch a satellite Read.


learn science, technology, engineering, arts and math, Raytown students will launch a satellite  Read.

learn science, technology, engineering, arts and math, Raytown students will launch a satellite Read.

Raytown high school students this coming school year have a new mission launching a spacecraft into orbit.Through a partnership with Interorbital Systems, a California company, students from Raytowns two high schools will build, test and launch a low orbit satellite into space.Superintendent Allan Markley announced Tuesday  24 hours before the 47th anniversary of the day Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin landed on the moon in 1969  that his district will be one of only a handful of K12 districts in the country to send a payload into orbit.The idea for the effort began with the districts technology department when teachers were looking for a way to integrate science, technology, engineering, arts and math into a district project that would provide hands on experience for students.Before the close of the last school year, 12 students were selected for the initial team of student project builders. During the school year the project will be open to any student who wants to participate, said Melissa Tebbenkamp, director of instructional technology for the district.I am very excited,said Raytown South sophomore Jacob Dodd, who is one of the 12 students. Engineering has always been a passion for me. This project is a gateway for me, a way to fill out my passion and my hobby. And I can put this on a resume someday.Guided by about 10 teachers from various subject areas, students throughout the school year will develop skills related to project management, engineering, programming, radio operation, photography and marketing while building the satellite and documenting their progress.Students will chronicle their efforts and progress via blog posts and on social media, said Tebbenkamp.

Students will meet after school to work on building the satellite. Interorbital will send the district a satellite kit, which includes the sheet metal satellite structural components, printed circuit board, Electronic components, solar cells, batteries, transceiver with an authorized frequency allocation from the FCC, antennas, microcomputer and the required programming tools.The satellite that students will build is about the size of a small coffee can.On the ground the satellite can be received by a hand held amateur radio receiver. According to directions on the Interorbital website, the satellite can broadcast and receive messages from orbit and function as an orbital amateur radio relay station. The project also allows the builder to add experiments or functions.The program is an effort few school districts and communities have pursued, and our students are energized to make it happen, Markley said.Markley said the satellite is scheduled for launch in May 2017 off the coast of California on Interorbitals Neptune Rocket. In orbit, the satellite will collect information and data that teachers will use to enhance Raytowns K12 STEAM science, technology, engineering, arts and math curriculum.




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